Aaron Craven - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://www.jazzreview.com Mon, 22 May 2017 20:34:47 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Calling Coltrane by Sangeeta Michael Berardi http://www.jazzreview.com/new-jazz-releases/calling-coltrane-by-sangeeta-michael-berardi.html http://www.jazzreview.com/new-jazz-releases/calling-coltrane-by-sangeeta-michael-berardi.html An homage to the later Impulse! recordings of the late tenor master, John Coltrane, Calling Coltrane pits free improvisation and striking rhythmic instability in a way that challenges the listener to find their own path to understanding Berardi's musical point.

Calling Coltrane, originally recorded in 1996 and the companion release to 2008's Earthship, is the most recent offering from avant-garde guitarist Sangeeta Michael Berardi.  An homage to the later Impulse! recordings of the late tenor master, John Coltrane, Calling Coltrane pits free improvisation and striking rhythmic instability in a way that challenges the listener to find their own path to understanding Berardi's musical point.

The album features three unusual pairings of guitar and drum set that work to set the overall tone of the album.  Throughout, Berardi and drummer John Esposito work to a fervor to both compliment each other and also push to find the limits of their own playing.  It is in these three cuts, "Thank You, Trane," "Calling Coltrane," and "Wise One," that we hear some of Berardi's most inventive and personal playing.

As coarse as Calling Coltrane begins, there is a salient balance to this album.  With the chaotic and seemingly disjointed feel of the drum set and guitar tracks, stability is found in "Sic for Rashied," where everyone makes their peace with the groove and they give in to some of their most sincere performances.  This is most notably embraced by saxophone/flutist James Finn.  Soaring and emotional Finn's solo in "Six for Rashied" gives gravity to an album that, up to this point, had yet to establish what it wanted to be.

The backside of Calling Coltrane features a pair of guitar and flute duets that are truly some of the finest music included.  Pastoral and refined, Berardi's obligato guitar accompaniment over Finn's delicate flute performance delights.

Sangeeta Michael Berardi set out to create a tribute to the experimental and dynamic compositions of John Coltrane.  Stretching the boundaries of what we understand and accept to be tonal music, Berardi himself forces the listener to withhold his music for their own judgment.  Tracks to listen to: "Six for Rashied," "Three for the Trees," and "Five for Finn."

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) New Jazz Releases Fri, 13 Apr 2012 03:29:15 -0500
A-mé by Hiroe Sekine http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/a-me-by-hiroe-sekine.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/a-me-by-hiroe-sekine.html If you are like me, the last thing you are looking for in a modern jazz album is another run-out cut of “All The Things You Are.” During my first listen of Hiroe Sekine’s debut album A-mé, I found myself stopped in the middle of the street (I was walking the dog at the time), fumbling for my i-Pod, trying to find the name of the track I was listening. It sounded so familiar, yet I couldn’t put my finger on it. As it progressed, the ostinato of the piano with a subtle Latin groove gently undernea

If you are like me, the last thing you are looking for in a modern jazz album is another run-out cut of “All The Things You Are.” During my first listen of Hiroe Sekine’s debut album A-mé, I found myself stopped in the middle of the street (I was walking the dog at the time), fumbling for my i-Pod, trying to find the name of the track I was listening. It sounded so familiar, yet I couldn’t put my finger on it. As it progressed, the ostinato of the piano with a subtle Latin groove gently underneath draws you in. The first entrance of the melody is so familiar, yet everything sounds upside-down. It is not until the third or fourth chorus that you really start to get settled in and it is all confirmed. This is not your everyday “All The Things You Are.” This is different. This is what it means to put a new spin on an old tune.

Born in Japan, Hiroe began playing the piano at age four and went on to study jazz and composition at the University of Southern California. While at USC, she earned the “Discovery Scholars” and “Jazz Chamber Music Ensemble” Awards in 2009.

Among the outstanding players featured on this album are: Peter Erskine, drums; Bob McChesney, trombone; Bob Sheppard, saxophone; Russell Ferrante, synthesizer. Each bring their “A” game creating tight horn harmonies and solid solos throughout. McChesney’s trombone solo on “Vera Cruz,” Sheppard’s tenor solo on “If I Were A Bell,” and Erskine’s drumming on Isham Jones’ “There Is No Greater Love” are worth the price of admission alone. Holding the band together is bass player Tony Dumas who doesn't seem to miss a beat while fueling the band with his strong bass sound. Hiroe’s arrangements and own compositions are impeccably done with the originality of the arrangement to Gigi Gryce’s “Minority,” to the album's closer. “Sand-Smog” is a fantastic, up-tempo jaunt featuring everyone in the band. However, the one track I keep coming back to over and over again is her solo piano take on Cole Porter’s “Every Time We Say Good-Bye.” Stripped down and to-the-point, beautiful music always speaks for itself and this is no exception.

A-mé is a solid album that will be on my playlist for some time to come. Tracks to listen to: “Minority,” “All The Things You Are,” “A-mé,” and “Every Time We Say Good-Bye.”

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Sat, 12 Mar 2011 00:00:00 -0600
Gemini by Koby Hayon http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/folk-jazz-cd-reviews/gemini-by-koby-hayon.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/folk-jazz-cd-reviews/gemini-by-koby-hayon.html Koby Hayon’s debut album, Gemini, features a wide-open style of playing that gives the trio plenty of room to fill space and experiment with the pushing and pulling of time to shape the musical space around them. Featuring drummer Jerome Morris and veteran bassist Kermit Driscoll, Hayon's compositions blend traditional jazz guitar with Middle-Eastern song and pop. Born in Israel, Hayon works to incorporate the indigenous Middle-Eastern sound of his home throughout his compositions and improvisat

Koby Hayon’s debut album, Gemini, features a wide-open style of playing that gives the trio plenty of room to fill space and experiment with the pushing and pulling of time to shape the musical space around them.

Featuring drummer Jerome Morris and veteran bassist Kermit Driscoll, Hayon's compositions blend traditional jazz guitar with Middle-Eastern song and pop. Born in Israel, Hayon works to incorporate the indigenous Middle-Eastern sound of his home throughout his compositions and improvisations. Before arriving in New York in 2001, Hayon studied at the Rimon School of Jazz and Contemporary Music in Tel Aviv. Hayon went on to study with John Abercrombie and Todd Coolman at Purchase College outside of NYC. It is hard to pin down the overall vibe of this album. The guitar playing is very disjunct with solos seemingly put together with a number of rather unrelated ideas.

Hayon pieces together quick tonal scaler runs with jagged, slightly atonal arpeggios to create a constant sense of tension. This is, of course, not true throughout the album - on the title track Hayon cuts a refreshingly melodic solo that lends itself nicely to the rhythm section and also blends well with the melody of the tune. Just when you think there is a real spark of energy, the lights go out. Tracks to listen to: “Norwegian Wood” and “Gemini.”

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Folk Jazz - CD Reviews Sat, 05 Mar 2011 06:00:00 -0600
Spiral by Dr. Lonnie Smith http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/spiral-by-dr.-lonnie-smith.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/spiral-by-dr.-lonnie-smith.html Achingly soulful with a hint of apathetic teenage angst, from top to bottom, Spiral drips with an honesty that has been lacking with many of the latest jazz offerings of the past decade. Trimmed out with guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg and drummer Jamire Williams, Dr. Smith’s current touring band, the tunes on this album run the gauntlet, from Slide Hampton and Frank Loesser to Rodgers and Hart. Not limited by the three man line-up, Spiral is full of textual nuance that rumbles by the listener with
Achingly soulful with a hint of apathetic teenage angst, from top to bottom, Spiral drips with an honesty that has been lacking with many of the latest jazz offerings of the past decade. Trimmed out with guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg and drummer Jamire Williams, Dr. Smith’s current touring band, the tunes on this album run the gauntlet, from Slide Hampton and Frank Loesser to Rodgers and Hart. Not limited by the three man line-up, Spiral is full of textual nuance that rumbles by the listener with each polished track. Kicking the album off is an energized delivery of "Mellow Mood," by the late organ great Jimmy Smith. Almost stealing the show is Kreisberg’s guitar solo. Reserved and calculated, Kreisberg’s solo lines are long and deliberate. Developing through the melody, Kreisberg is able to stack notes effortlessly in the most innovative way. This is a cut that really showcases how fresh and tight this band is. Dr. Smith’s improvisational skills are taken to task on the album’s second track, “I’ve Never Been In Love Before.” On this track, Dr. Smith balances his walking bass line with a relentlessly hip solo, that, along with the drumming of Jamire Williams, swings this tune incredibly hard. This is the reason to really love organ jazz! The album is balanced with two great ballads that are serene and sweet. All too often, artists tend to languish in an energy vacuum with the ballad. Here, we are treated to soft music that is not soft on emotion or energy. Listening closely to “Frame For The Blues,” you will clearly hear Dr. Smith moaning along with each sexualized note as he bends and stretches for every lick. “Sprial,” the albums strongest groove, is sharp with shadowed possibility and dark melodic improvisation by both Dr. Smith and guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg. This track has a veiled sense of depth that is aided with the amped-up reverb incorporated into Williams’ drum sound. It is not everyday that such a well-executed album is released. In its composition, Spiral knocks out every track with imaginative playing and a solid drive. Tracks to listen to: “Mellow Mood,” “I’ve Never Been In Love Before,” “Sweet and Lovely,” “Spiral.”
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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Sat, 19 Feb 2011 18:00:00 -0600
Flights Volume One by Sean Harkness and Mike Harriott http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/flights-volume-one-by-sean-harkness-and-mike-harriott.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/flights-volume-one-by-sean-harkness-and-mike-harriott.html On the surface, putting together a duo album seems like a pretty straight-ahead idea: you get some tunes together and head to the studio. All too often though, the mojo that keeps a duo album from going stale runs out. Without the collaboration that comes with putting together four or five players in a room, melodic lines float about unanswered and the comping of the guitar can become labored. The energy and spontaneous creativity that is needed to breathe life into the album deflates. Flights:

On the surface, putting together a duo album seems like a pretty straight-ahead idea: you get some tunes together and head to the studio. All too often though, the mojo that keeps a duo album from going stale runs out. Without the collaboration that comes with putting together four or five players in a room, melodic lines float about unanswered and the comping of the guitar can become labored. The energy and spontaneous creativity that is needed to breathe life into the album deflates. Flights: Volume One is not such an album.

Guitarist Sean Harkness and Trumpeter Mike Herriott put on an audible clinic of deft collaboration. Responsive to each other’s every musical thought, Flights: Volume One is a must-listen album of carefully crafted, new music. Harkness and Herriott’s first collaboration, Flights: Volume One, was recorded in both New York and Toronto, cities which both artists attribute as playing an important role in setting the tone for the album. From the straight-ahead jam, “Gambled,” to the album’s dream-evoking closer “Hammock Time,” Flights: Volume One runs the gamut of jazz stylings.

Not all the tunes on this album are duets (although I found the best material on the album to be the five charts that were simply guitar and horn). The album’s opener, “Spring Break,” brings the bass playing of Jim Vivian and the drumming of Kevin Coady. Propelled by a quick Latin bass groove that is peppered with a six-bar, half-time, funk interlude, “Spring Break” quickly sets an attitude of tight harmonic motion and clean improvisation. Some of the most outstanding guitar work on the album is featured in the album’s second track, “Leap Year.” Guitarist Sean Harkness furnishes the track with a rich harmonic pallet in which he simultaneously mixes improvisation, muted guitar licks, and gritty slap bass lines to provide a complex texture of accompaniment.

The warm and inviting tone of Mike Herriott’s flugelhorn on “Hedge Your Bets” is well -controlled, with close attention paid to not over-extend this traditionally mellow instrument. Throughout, Herriott is pushing just enough to get an edge, but not too much to seem tacky or melodramatic. Both guitar and horn work very hard to compliment each other’s sounds, and on this track, it really shows.

I very much look forward to the next flight by these two immensely talented musicians. Flights: Volume One is definitely an album worthy of heavy rotation in your jazz listening library. Tracks to listen to: “Leap Year,” “Myffed,” “Hedge Your Bets,” and “And Lost...”

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Fri, 18 Feb 2011 18:00:00 -0600
Stories by Marco Spedaliere http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/contemporary-jazz-cd-reviews/stories-by-marco-spedaliere.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/contemporary-jazz-cd-reviews/stories-by-marco-spedaliere.html Contemporary Italian saxophonist Marco Spedaliere’s latest album, Stories, encompasses a wide range of compositional styles from the free-form synth and saxophone tune, “Waiting Tomorrow”, to the 80’s sax homages, “Luoghi Comuni” and “Crypto”. Stories offers a nice glimpse into the contemporary jazz scene of twenty-first century Italy. Backed by a solid showing by bassist Davide Costagliola and pianist Dario Zeno, Spedaliere is able to produce a worthy modern take on the over the top “sax-centri

Contemporary Italian saxophonist Marco Spedaliere’s latest album, Stories, encompasses a wide range of compositional styles from the free-form synth and saxophone tune, “Waiting Tomorrow”, to the 80’s sax homages, “Luoghi Comuni” and “Crypto”.

Stories offers a nice glimpse into the contemporary jazz scene of twenty-first century Italy. Backed by a solid showing by bassist Davide Costagliola and pianist Dario Zeno, Spedaliere is able to produce a worthy modern take on the over the top “sax-centric” smooth jazz album. Spedaliere brings a refined and technical vibe to the album on which he plays each of the four saxophones. I find his soprano tone to be particularly inviting with the albums opening track. He is able to get an edge out of his sound without overdoing it and, in turn, he truly draws the listener in.

The inventive harmonic progression of “Made in China”, the albums sixth track, shows Spedaliere’s ability to be imaginative with form and work from a broad pallet. The combination of mallet percussion with the consistent back beat proved by the piano gives this composition a fresh feel with the music always being propelled forward. “Luoghi Comuni” takes a page right from Vince DiCola’s movie score to Rocky IV with a bridge that is heavy with synth horns, which gives Spedaliere plenty of room to flex his improvisational muscles. The tune is hammered home by the exceptional playing from bassist Davide Costagliola and the strong rock beat provided by drummer Sergio Di Natale. As with most albums, clunkers do exist, and Stories is no exception. The aforementioned “Waiting Tomorrow” and the album’s final track “To the Rising Sun” fail to keep pace with the stylistic and compositional constancy that the rest of the tracks possess. Overall, there is a lot to like with the latest release from Marco Spedaliere. Tracks to listen to: “An image of You”, “Luoghi Comuni”, and “Made in China”.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Contemporary Jazz - CD Reviews Sat, 12 Feb 2011 18:00:00 -0600
Spiral by Dr. Lonnie Smith http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/spiral-by-dr.-lonnie-smith.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/spiral-by-dr.-lonnie-smith.html Achingly soulful with a hint of apathetic teenage angst, from top to bottom, Spiral drips with an honesty that has been lacking with many of the latest jazz offerings of th…
Achingly soulful with a hint of apathetic teenage angst, from top to bottom, Spiral drips with an honesty that has been lacking with many of the latest jazz offerings of the past decade. Trimmed out with guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg and drummer Jamire Williams, Dr. Smith’s current touring band, the tunes on this album run the gauntlet, from Slide Hampton and Frank Loesser to Rodgers and Hart. Not limited by the three man line-up, Spiral is full of textual nuance that rumbles by the listener with each polished track. Kicking the album off is an energized delivery of "Mellow Mood," by the late organ great Jimmy Smith. Almost stealing the show is Kreisberg’s guitar solo. Reserved and calculated, Kreisberg’s solo lines are long and deliberate. Developing through the melody, Kreisberg is able to stack notes effortlessly in the most innovative way. This is a cut that really showcases how fresh and tight this band is. Dr. Smith’s improvisational skills are taken to task on the album’s second track, "I’ve Never Been In Love Before." On this track, Dr. Smith balances his walking bass line with a relentlessly hip solo, that, along with the drumming of Jamire Williams, swings this tune incredibly hard. This is the reason to really love organ jazz! The album is balanced with two great ballads that are serene and sweet. All too often, artists tend to languish in an energy vacuum with the ballad. Here, we are treated to soft music that is not soft on emotion or energy. Listening closely to "Frame For The Blues," you will clearly hear Dr. Smith moaning along with each sexualized note as he bends and stretches for every lick. "Sprial," the albums strongest groove, is sharp with shadowed possibility and dark melodic improvisation by both Dr. Smith and guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg. This track has a veiled sense of depth that is aided with the amped-up reverb incorporated into Williams’ drum sound. It is not everyday that such a well-executed album is released. In its composition, Spiral knocks out every track with imaginative playing and a solid drive. Tracks to listen to: "Mellow Mood," "I’ve Never Been In Love Before," "Sweet and Lovely," "Spiral."
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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Tue, 02 Mar 2010 18:00:00 -0600
Flights Volume One by Sean Harkness and Mike Harriott http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/flights-volume-one-by-sean-harkness-and-mike-harriott.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/flights-volume-one-by-sean-harkness-and-mike-harriott.html On the surface, putting together a duo album seems like a pretty straight-ahead idea: you get some tunes together and head to the studio. All too often though, the mojo …

On the surface, putting together a duo album seems like a pretty straight-ahead idea: you get some tunes together and head to the studio. All too often though, the mojo that keeps a duo album from going stale runs out. Without the collaboration that comes with putting together four or five players in a room, melodic lines float about unanswered and the comping of the guitar can become labored. The energy and spontaneous creativity that is needed to breathe life into the album deflates. Flights: Volume One is not such an album.

Guitarist Sean Harkness and Trumpeter Mike Herriott put on an audible clinic of deft collaboration. Responsive to each other’s every musical thought, Flights: Volume One is a must-listen album of carefully crafted, new music. Harkness and Herriott’s first collaboration, Flights: Volume One, was recorded in both New York and Toronto, cities which both artists attribute as playing an important role in setting the tone for the album. From the straight-ahead jam, "Gambled," to the album’s dream-evoking closer "Hammock Time," Flights: Volume One runs the gamut of jazz stylings.

Not all the tunes on this album are duets (although I found the best material on the album to be the five charts that were simply guitar and horn). The album’s opener, "Spring Break," brings the bass playing of Jim Vivian and the drumming of Kevin Coady. Propelled by a quick Latin bass groove that is peppered with a six-bar, half-time, funk interlude, "Spring Break" quickly sets an attitude of tight harmonic motion and clean improvisation. Some of the most outstanding guitar work on the album is featured in the album’s second track, "Leap Year." Guitarist Sean Harkness furnishes the track with a rich harmonic pallet in which he simultaneously mixes improvisation, muted guitar licks, and gritty slap bass lines to provide a complex texture of accompaniment.

The warm and inviting tone of Mike Herriott’s flugelhorn on "Hedge Your Bets" is well -controlled, with close attention paid to not over-extend this traditionally mellow instrument. Throughout, Herriott is pushing just enough to get an edge, but not too much to seem tacky or melodramatic. Both guitar and horn work very hard to compliment each other’s sounds, and on this track, it really shows.

I very much look forward to the next flight by these two immensely talented musicians. Flights: Volume One is definitely an album worthy of heavy rotation in your jazz listening library. Tracks to listen to: "Leap Year," "Myffed," "Hedge Your Bets," and "And Lost..."

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Mon, 01 Mar 2010 12:00:00 -0600
Pressing Forward by D-Lucca http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/contemporary-jazz-cd-reviews/ http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/contemporary-jazz-cd-reviews/ Pressing Forward, by west coast electric bassist Daniel Lucca Parenti, or rather just "D-Lucca," paints a scenic landscape of layered bass and harmonic solitude…

Pressing Forward, by west coast electric bassist Daniel Lucca Parenti, or rather just "D-Lucca," paints a scenic landscape of layered bass and harmonic solitude.

Balanced with traditional bass grooves, D-Lucca uses his piccolo bass to cut sharp melodic lines that sing out from the serene feel of this album. With all edges delicately rounded, the title track is an impressive example of balanced playing with all parts complimenting each other. The piccolo bass’ striking melody being played in sync with the soprano saxophone, and D-Lucca himself overdubbing a solid bass line, create a strong meditative groove that entices the listener further into this track.

"Passage to Erowan," the album’s seventh cut, twists and turns the ten-note melody into a number of shapeless harmonic contours. Looping phased-out layers of the piccolo bass, D-Lucca improvises through a composition that simultaneously goes nowhere and leaves the listener with a feeling of upward motion. In contrast, "Bring It All Together," the album’s tenth track, is a strong R&B jam that lets the bass explore a much more straight-ahead sense of improvisation. Mixing both clean and distorted bass riffs, D-Lucca carefully manages the energy of this tune. The addition of background voices in harmony throughout, along with a strong tenor sax solo, gives this track a feeling of balance.

As the album progresses, I get the notion, as the title might suggest, that the music is moving towards a virtuous culmination in which each track is building to a tune that metaphorically sums up the album’s message. Quietly, a baby cries and "Little Lucca," the album closing tune, begins softly. Note by note, this track builds into the best groove on the album. Simple and to the point, the music speaks for its self. At its best, Pressing Forward is a pleasant listen. At a glance, you will find inviting harmonies and easy-to-listen-to solo lines; a smooth and well-polished work. Tracks to listen to: "Pressing Forward," "Little African Journee," "Bring It All Together," and "Little Lucca."

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Contemporary Jazz - CD Reviews Fri, 26 Feb 2010 06:00:00 -0600
Stories by Marco Spedaliere http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/contemporary-jazz-cd-reviews/ http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/contemporary-jazz-cd-reviews/ Stories by Marco Spedaliere
Contemporary Italian saxophonist Marco Spedaliere’s latest album, Stories, encompasses a wide range of compositional styles from the free-form synth and saxopho…

Contemporary Italian saxophonist Marco Spedaliere’s latest album, Stories, encompasses a wide range of compositional styles from the free-form synth and saxophone tune, "Waiting Tomorrow", to the 80’s sax homages, "Luoghi Comuni" and "Crypto".

Stories offers a nice glimpse into the contemporary jazz scene of twenty-first century Italy. Backed by a solid showing by bassist Davide Costagliola and pianist Dario Zeno, Spedaliere is able to produce a worthy modern take on the over the top "sax-centric" smooth jazz album. Spedaliere brings a refined and technical vibe to the album on which he plays each of the four saxophones. I find his soprano tone to be particularly inviting with the albums opening track. He is able to get an edge out of his sound without overdoing it and, in turn, he truly draws the listener in.

The inventive harmonic progression of "Made in China", the albums sixth track, shows Spedaliere’s ability to be imaginative with form and work from a broad pallet. The combination of mallet percussion with the consistent back beat proved by the piano gives this composition a fresh feel with the music always being propelled forward. "Luoghi Comuni" takes a page right from Vince DiCola’s movie score to Rocky IV with a bridge that is heavy with synth horns, which gives Spedaliere plenty of room to flex his improvisational muscles. The tune is hammered home by the exceptional playing from bassist Davide Costagliola and the strong rock beat provided by drummer Sergio Di Natale. As with most albums, clunkers do exist, and Stories is no exception. The aforementioned "Waiting Tomorrow" and the album’s final track "To the Rising Sun" fail to keep pace with the stylistic and compositional constancy that the rest of the tracks possess. Overall, there is a lot to like with the latest release from Marco Spedaliere. Tracks to listen to: "An image of You", "Luoghi Comuni", and "Made in China".

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Aaron Craven) Contemporary Jazz - CD Reviews Tue, 23 Feb 2010 12:00:00 -0600