Barry Kavanagh - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://www.jazzreview.com Tue, 23 May 2017 19:41:16 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb New speeds http://www.jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/new-speeds.html http://www.jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/new-speeds.html Hunched over their instruments in Oslo's basement-like John Dee venue, this four-piece is an unprecedented mixture of different musical styles. They are rooted in the free jazz tradition set in motion by Ornette Coleman, and all the music is wholly improvised. They are also firmly within the electronic category, especially the kind of electronica typified by artists like Autechre, who based their music around avoiding the "tension and release" of rock music. This music also involves the tradi

Hunched over their instruments in Oslo's basement-like John Dee venue, this four-piece is an unprecedented mixture of different musical styles. They are rooted in the free jazz tradition set in motion by Ornette Coleman, and all the music is wholly improvised. They are also firmly within the electronic category, especially the kind of electronica typified by artists like Autechre, who based their music around avoiding the "tension and release" of rock music. This music also involves the tradition of those who experiment in noise and ambient sound. And while Supersilent can be noisy, they also have the ability to completely hold back, playing only sweet sounds with synth, trumpet or just a lone voice, singing sounds without words. It's the abstractness that's important, not whether it is manifested in a pleasant or harsh way. After all, "supersilent" could mean both "very silent" and "above silent".

A live experience of this band is one that I have always heard raved about, and I finally got my chance at this festival. I thought it took them about 45 minutes to really warm up, though. You see, at first I felt I was hearing nothing that showed development from what I'd heard on the albums. There is always a danger that they will cease to develop. I wanted to hear them improvise something new. I finally got what I wanted when some kind of tape delay sound was looped, joining Arve Henriksen's high-pitched and reverberated wailing, and then Helge Sten started playing some kind of electronic version of a lap steel guitar. They followed this piece with something completely ultra-aggressive, with Henriksen screaming into a vocoder like a toy robot in love with the wrong kind of heavy rock, and Sten moved around some kind of theremin thing clasped in his fist. Then everything went faster than light...

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Barry Kavanagh) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:37:32 -0600
All Aglow http://www.jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/all-aglow.html http://www.jazzreview.com/concert-reviews/all-aglow.html The Scene West Victoria venue is packed full for the 2005 Oslo Jazz Festival appearance of one of Norway's sweetest-sounding jazz singers and her four musical collaborators. One of these men is probably the most inventive musicians in Norway at the moment, Morten Qvenild (also a member of Susanna & the Magical Orchestra and In The Country). This band manage to mix electronic clicks and squeaks with their more conventional instruments (piano, trumpet, double bass and drums) but in an incredib
The Scene West Victoria venue is packed full for the 2005 Oslo Jazz Festival appearance of one of Norway's sweetest-sounding jazz singers and her four musical collaborators. One of these men is probably the most inventive musicians in Norway at the moment, Morten Qvenild (also a member of Susanna & the Magical Orchestra and In The Country). This band manage to mix electronic clicks and squeaks with their more conventional instruments (piano, trumpet, double bass and drums) but in an incredibly subtle way. There is so much subtlety in the playing of all instruments - drummer Per Oddvar Johansen bowing the sides of cymbals spring to mind - that this show is a real quiet treat. Apparently one of Qvenild's influences is Morton Feldman, and gentle silences are welcome here. Most of the songs tonight come from their new album Pixiedust, dominated by interpretations of the songs of reclusive songwriter Peder Kjellsby. But they also perform a gripping version of Tom Waits' "Take It With Me," the audience hanging on every word Solveig sings, and an astonishing version of Nina Simone's song of damnation, "Nobody's Fault But Mine," bringing out all its necessary power and intensity. But there's a clever balance of light and darkness here, Billie Holiday's "Don't Explain" being followed immediately by an a capella "Look For The Silver Lining". Pure warmth.
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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Barry Kavanagh) Concert Reviews Sat, 29 Jan 2011 09:37:31 -0600