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Lyn Horton

Lyn Horton

29.01.2011

A Second Listen

Published in Jazz Viewpoints

Today I re-listened to EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, the okkadisk CD released this year. I listened to it in the context of the nature of the recording: live or studio. Since I originally wrote about this CD, I have reviewed and heard other live recordings and have resultantly become increasingly aware of the way in which they are mastered.

EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION is a live recording. I did not remember being annoyed by the humming of conversation and the clanking of glasses and bottles …

It is with certainty that I know that this is not the first time within the recent past that a writer has paused to examine the meaning of existence and how that meaning is pursued by individuals who live on this earth in a non-geopolitical/economic context.

The question arises through what mode is a sense of loss, mystery, the passage of time, internal value expressed? The mode is that to which there is the most easy access. That is to say, the mode that is closest to the strain of crea …
29.01.2011

Joe McPhee

Published in Jazz Viewpoints
Drummer Randy Kaye brought together, in an unusual setting for improvisational music, bassist Richard Downs, reed players Joe Giardullo and Joe McPhee. This gig, juxtaposed with listening to the Hat Hut reissue on CD of McPhee’s first solo album TENOR, brought to light an understanding of McPhee’s playing heretofore unrealizable.

The focus of Joe’s music is to strike a balance between structure and expression. These are polarities in the musical world. The distance between them allows for a m …

29.01.2011

Of My Own Invention

Published in Jazz Viewpoints
I am listening to Anthony Braxton’s 1971 recording FOR ALTO. This recording was the first of its kind; that is, of a musician making a totally solo recording on one instrument.

I do not care that I know this. What I do care about is the fact that I can listen and basically understand how Braxton is coming up with the music. It is more spontaneous, for instance, than my writing these words. Unless he edited his recording later, which is not the case, Braxton improvised on the alto sax only wit …

29.01.2011

Where I Left Off

Published in Jazz Viewpoints
On December 13,2002 (and that was Friday, the thirteenth) I heard a quartet of "championship" proportions at the Meetinghouse in Amherst, MA. The quartet abounded with Joe McPhee, saxophones and pocket trumpet, Roy Campbell, trumpet, flute and pocket trumpet, William Parker, string bass and wooden flutes, and Warren Smith, drums.

Reviewing this concert almost seems superfluous in regards to how it truly affected me. The music was unparalleled. I sat in the first row, so close to the soun …
29.01.2011

DJ Spooky & Me

Published in Jazz Viewpoints
In the spring of 2002, the cover story of Signal to Noise Magazine was DJ SPOOKY MEETS MATTHEW SHIPP. Matthew Shipp is a terrific musician, one of the outstanding piano improvisors and an acquaintance. My interest in him took me right to the article. The article illuminated the incredible intelligence of both musicians in the text of the conversation between them. The article also and, significantly, brought DJ Spooky to my attention.

A couple of months ago, Thirsty Ear Records sent me a revi …

29.01.2011

Matt's Metaphysics

Published in Jazz Viewpoints
In 1998, Matthew Shipp played the piano in a performance with Other Dimensions in Music in Amherst, Massachusetts. This was the first avant-garde music concert I had ever attended and the first about which I would attempt to write and successfully did.

Matthew’s music was familiar to me by way of the radio. Any prior awareness of him resulted from his name being in the air, so to speak. This is the same kind of familiarity I had had with William Parker; I had carried his name with me for near …

29.01.2011

Defining Thurston

Published in Jazz Viewpoints
Back in March, at the conclusion of my interviewing DJ Spooky (Paul Miller), he asked me if I knew Thurston Moore. I said: No. Paul left it at that because someone came seeking answers for some sort of performance question. Thurston’s name did not come within my spectrum of interest until I received the promotional material from MASSMoCA regarding the summer’s activities. I saw that Thurston was commissioned by the Bang on A Can Ensemble to write a piece for the group. I bought a ticket right aw …
Weeks ago, Thirsty Ear Records asked me if I would like to interview David S. Ware in connection with the release of a new recording which features a new ensemble including his quartet of long-standing. I responded, Yes.

David S. Ware personified for me one of the great players of the saxophone. I did not know the Ware’s complete discography. CORRIDORS & PARALLELS and FREEDOM SUITE (a tribute to his friend Sonny Rollins), I had written about a while back. CRYPTOLOGY and DAO of the mid 90’s pr …

29.01.2011

Resounding Thinking

Published in Jazz Viewpoints
A post-it on my computer desktop keeps telling me to write this article. My experiences in life and with music have increased a gazillion (taking this word from NYT columnist, Maureen Dowd) fold in recent years. I suppose it is for the reason that music for me, as it does for many others, serves as a comforting heartbeat existing outside of my own and informs me that I am not alone. Writing about how the music I listen to affects me is an activity which I like to share because I treat each artic …