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FEATURED INTERVIEWS

  • George Duke is a multi Grammy Award winning legend. So, when I called him to get a few quick quotes for my France Joli interview (he produced her album 'Witch Of Love') I quickly realized I needed to milk this…
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  • Born in Dallas, Texas and now happily domiciled in Los Angeles, bass player Edwin Livingston could be described as being on the crest of a wave.  His CD 'Transitions' was released in late 2010 and when recently I caught up…
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  • Kem Owens
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    Adekemi Owens, known professionally and affectionately to music fans as "Kem," has come a long way from Nashville, Tennessee to his current hometown of Detroit, Michigan. So, one figures that is why this musical genius has written and performed songs…
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  •  New Orleans trumpeter Nicholas Payton has never conformed to anyone or anything. Reading his Facebook posts and Twitter “tweets”, you sort of get an idea about how un-traditional he is. He speaks his mind and, should someone attempt to challenge…
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MORE INTERVIEWS
Mike Brannon

Mike Brannon

Weckl's latest "Transition" might cause you to think you've found a "Weather Report" disc you'd never heard and even check the cover again to be sure. The music is all orig…
Sometimes a new face just seems to come out of the blue. A talent that wasn't there and just then was. For Debbie Deane, as with most talents, it was the usual decade plus …
"Anna is original, unique, different. She’s brave, she's modest, she’s open. She's a great musician. What she's been doing all her life is just trying to play the best notes. Trying to sound good. In that particular sense she's a lot like me and that's why I decided to work with her. Because she just cares for the music". - Pat Metheny

Not surprisingly, It’s a rare thing for Metheny to endorse or to work with anyone who's not already a jazz icon or one in the making. We know the names alread …

29.01.2011

Bela Fleck

Published in Jazz Artist Interviews
"I was driving around Nashville when I stopped to get a Coke. I was only going to be a minute so I left my banjo in the car, but when I got back someone had broken in and left another banjo!" Ok, we’ve probably all heard that one a time or two and I’m sure Bela Fleck’s heard it an even thousand times now. He may have even made it up. But if the oft’ maligned banjo (like Southern accents or trailer parks) were ever a running joke, it’s certainly not in his hands now.

It's often said that the …

29.01.2011

Dave Douglas

Published in Jazz Artist Interviews
The trumpet’s a strange, little instrument. A few feet of plated brass tubing on which legendary careers have been built. Yet like any instrument essentially a tool to produce sound - no two play are played alike. Consider and contrast the subdued, thoughtful delivery of Miles’ muted tone, the stratospheric blasts of Dizzy or the rich, burnished finish of Kenny Dorham; each distinctive and memorable, each pushing and exploiting various and separate boundaries of the instruments and music itself. …
It used to be that each city had its own recognizable sound. Besides New York, there was Motown, the New Orleans thing, Memphis and Chicago. Each had his or her own brand of blues, jazz, funk and eclectic provincial mixes. Even Philly had its sound. Now with stylistic homogenization, increased travel and the Internet, things only hint at identities once strong and recognizable. Music is the sum of its creators and purveyors. With the gradual restoration of the original values that put these citi …
29.01.2011

Randy Brecker

Published in Jazz Artist Interviews

Forty years after he began his music career, Jazz trumpeter Randy Brecker comes to life as he talks about the new directions emerging in the genre. Brecker says that the globalization of Jazz music, "just adds to the spicy mix of Jazz." He points to bassist Richard Bona from Minta Eastern Cameroon as a perfect example of someone who has infused a new element into Jazz. "His brand of Jazz is mixed in with an incredible array of folk influences that you just couldn't get from somebody who …

29.01.2011

Bill Evans

Published in Jazz Artist Interviews
The names just keep rolling as if from a waterfall Miles, and Miles’ alumni, John McLaughlin, Don Alias, John Scofield, Mike Stern, Al Foster, Marcus Miller, Robben Ford - also Randy Brecker, Les McCann, Andy Summers of the Police, Willie Nelson, Bruce Hornsby, Trilok Gurtu, Manolo Badrena, Elements, and many others. All these Evans has worked with in his over 25-year career.

Regardless of the lineup, the angular blues lines and implied harmony remain all about the groove for Evans. "Big Fun" …

29.01.2011

Brad Mehldau

Published in Jazz Artist Interviews
Jazz music is not just about hipness and swing, but it’s also about intellect. Among the younger generation of players, there are few more intellectual practioners than pianist Brad Mehldau.

Liner note readers were given an erudite treat with his 1999 Warner Bros. release, Elegiac Cycles, in which Mehldau lays his aesthetic credo in considerable detail. In the December 2003 edition of Jazz Times, he used a somewhat absurd debate about whether Sonny Rollins or Sonny Stitt is the …

29.01.2011

Wayne Shorter

Published in Jazz Artist Interviews
Though it’s all story-telling to the six-time Grammy winner who turns seventy on August 25, among the many other dimensions experienced in the music of Wayne Shorter are essentially its mystery, expansion of spirit, angular beauty, abstract truth, ponderous thoughtfulness and an uncannily synchronistic nature.

Since joining the modern music world's elite core of improvisers and composers in 1959 via Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers and as a leader in the Blue Note stable, Shorter's consistently …

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