Richard Bourcier - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://www.jazzreview.com Mon, 22 May 2017 20:21:08 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Traditionally Speaking by Jack Brass Band http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/traditional-/-new-orleans-cd-reviews/traditionally-speaking-by-jack-brass-band.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/traditional-/-new-orleans-cd-reviews/traditionally-speaking-by-jack-brass-band.html A great pot of beef stew always seems to taste better the second time around. So it is with the newest album by the Jack Brass Band is even more exciting than their 2005 CD…
A great pot of beef stew always seems to taste better the second time around. So it is with the newest album by the Jack Brass Band is even more exciting than their 2005 CD. It’s more traditional in its choice of material but still smacks of the fresh ideas of a modern band.

The Minnesota outfit frequently performs in New Orleans and its members often sit in with Crescent City treasures like the Rebirth Brass Band. Within the past year, they shared the stage with the likes of The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Africa’s Gangbe Brass Band and Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews. Unlike their debut CD, Traditionally Speaking does not contain any compositions by the band members but features their trademark arrangements of such old favorites as "Just a Little While To Stay Here" and the perennial "Just a Closer Walk With Thee" including the traditional switch to double tempo. The Jack Brass put together a really interesting version of "Back O’ Town Blues," a tune credited to Louis Armstrong and pianist Luis Russell. The young band spices up their arrangement with bits of "Tin Roof Blues" and it works nicely.

Sticking with the traditional New Orleans numbers, the group continues with Paul Barbarin’s "Bourbon Street Parade" and then a rollicking marching band favorite titled "Whoopin’ Blues." This piece has been recorded under a dozen and more titles as every band seems to tag it with their own moniker. Perhaps the most popular version in recent memory was performed by Harold Dejan’s Olympia Brass Band, tagged "The Olympia Special."

The Jack Brass Band pays tribute to the influences of rock and a stompin’ rendition of Fats Domino’s "I’m Walkin’" and Ray Charles’ "I Got a Woman." More recent years are acknowledged with the inclusion of Raw Breed’s 1997 hit, "Everything’s Lovely" and Hugh Masekela’s "Grazing In The Grass."

Assembled from sessions in Minneapolis and New Orleans, Traditionally Speaking will appeal to fans of New Orleans street bands and those younger folks who enjoy the modern street beat. It’s the kind of band that would be an instant hit at jazz, blues or roots music festivals. There are generous sound samples on the band’s web site or at CD Baby. Give it a listen! It’s good jazz!

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Traditional / New Orleans - CD Reviews Sun, 06 Jan 2008 00:00:00 -0600
If Dreams Come True by George Gee and the Jump Jivin’ Wailers http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/big-band-swing-cd-reviews/if-dreams-come-true-by-george-gee-and-the-jump-jivin-wailers.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/big-band-swing-cd-reviews/if-dreams-come-true-by-george-gee-and-the-jump-jivin-wailers.html Here’s one of the most-satisfying swing albums in quite a while. George Gee is a native New Yorker and has led a big band for three decades. His swing outfit delighted b…
Here’s one of the most-satisfying swing albums in quite a while.

George Gee is a native New Yorker and has led a big band for three decades. His swing outfit delighted both dancers and listeners in Pittsburgh and the Tri State area before returning home to New York in 1990. The present 10 piece band can be seen every Tuesday at the Swing46 Jazz & Supper Club on West 46th Street.

With the exception of one track, all tunes were recorded in January 2007. James P.Johnson’s "Victory Stride" is from a 1999 session and is a modernized version of Johnson’s original 1941 record that featured Sidney DeParis, Vic Dickenson, Ben Webster and Big Sid Catlett. Rick Germanson handles the piano duties on this track.

The CD kicks off with a sizzling reading of "All The Cats Join In." Listeners of this writer’s vintage will recall the piece from an animated jitterbug clip in the 1945 film, "Make Mine Music" and featuring Benny Goodman and Cozy Cole. Dan Block takes the clarinet solo on George Gee’s rendition.

With obvious admiration for several swing veterans, the leader packaged a fine selection of material made famous by such legends as Goodman, Krupa, Basie, Hampton and Fletcher Henderson. Walt Szymanski ably handled the arrangements and lead trumpet. Dan Barrett arranged the title tune. Barrett is known for his recordings on the Arbors Jazz label.

Maxjazz vocalist, Carla Cook, appears on "It Had To Be You." Cook is one of this writer’s favorite songbirds.

The songs on George Gee’s newest CD are not rehashed standards. It’s nice to see Eddie Durham’s "Topsy" and the Durham/Basie collaboration "Shorty George." Another unusual offering is a solid rendition of a Gene Krupa/ Roy Eldridge tune titled "Ball Of Fire" and on occasion "Nothing Yet." Willard Dyson’s drumming and Walt Szymanski’s trumpet give the old piece a fine "new look."

Interest listeners can find sound samples at your favorite on-line record store. It’s worth a visit!

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Big Band / Swing - CD Reviews Sat, 24 Feb 2007 00:00:00 -0600
Naughty, Bawdy & Blue by Maria Muldaur http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/blues-cd-reviews/naughty-bawdy-blue-by-maria-muldaur.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/blues-cd-reviews/naughty-bawdy-blue-by-maria-muldaur.html Good things always happen when like-minded artists gather together. This album brings together the legendary Maria Muldaur and James Dapogny’s Chicago Jazz Band, blues belt…
Good things always happen when like-minded artists gather together. This album brings together the legendary Maria Muldaur and James Dapogny’s Chicago Jazz Band, blues belter/guitarist Bonnie Raitt and the influences of the greatest names in blues history. Muldaur and friends do justice to songs made famous by such singers as Sippie Wallace, Bessie Smith, Victoria Spivey, Alberta Hunter, Ma Rainey, Ethel Waters, Sara Martin and Mamie Smith.

Maria Muldaur needs no introduction. She has been a supporter of vintage jazz and blues music since her early connection with the Even Dozen Jug Band and Jim Kweskin’s stellar outfit. The Kweskin band introduced a number of great players to jazz fans. Among them were Jeff and Maria Muldaur, violinist Richard Greene and the late jug blower Fritz Richmond. Maria Muldaur cemented her popularity in the mid-70s with a couple of commercial hits, "Midnight At The Oasis" and "I’m A Woman." Since then, she has pleased her fans by delving into a myriad of musical styles, including blues, bluegrass, jazz and folk.

James Dapogny is a music professor at the University of Michigan. Born in Berwyn, Illinois, Dapogny formed his Chicago Jazz Band almost three decades ago. We saw the band on their first appearance outside the USA at the Ottawa Jazz Festival about 1990. About a quarter of the way through their performance, I headed to the on-site record shop and grabbed a copy of their cassette album "For Real." As I expected, they were sold out by the end of the concert.

The pianist/leader is also a musicologist and jazz historian who fully appreciates the music that Maria Muldaur celebrates on this CD. The band still includes some original members, such as Russ Whitman, Rod McDonald and the amazing Kim Cusack. The original co-leader, drummer Wayne Jones, is missing and probably retired from music.

Bonnie Raitt joins Muldaur for a duet on "Separation Blues (Mama’s Gone Goodbye)," celebrating the music of Sippie Wallace. Both Muldaur and Raitt had the opportunity to perform and record with Wallace before her passing in 1986. It’s not a track that the listener will play only once. Bessie Smith fans will enjoy "Empty Bed Blues." Muldaur belts it out with Dave Matthews on piano and Kevin Porter on trombone. Porter sounds remarkably like Charlie "Trombone Cholly" Green on Bessie’s original recording. You won’t play this one "just once" either.

Naughty, Bawdy & Blue is probably Maria Muldaur’s finest CD in recent years. You’ll find sound samples at your favorite on-line record shop.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Blues - CD Reviews Sat, 10 Feb 2007 00:00:00 -0600
Cotton Blossom Time by Barfota Jazzmen http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/ragtime-jazz-cd-reviews/cotton-blossom-time-by-barfota-jazzmen.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/ragtime-jazz-cd-reviews/cotton-blossom-time-by-barfota-jazzmen.html Very few ragtime recordings are issued today, especially by European artists. The last to cross this writer’s desk was Alessandra Celletti’s beautiful Black Baby CD …
Very few ragtime recordings are issued today, especially by European artists. The last to cross this writer’s desk was Alessandra Celletti’s beautiful Black Baby CD back in 2002 dedicated to the work of Scott Joplin.

Cotton Blossom Time album is quite different in that it is performed by a small ragtime orchestra rather than by a solo pianist. It also features the compositions of a diverse group of classic ragtime writers plus a current composer, David Thomas Roberts. Roberts penned a tune titled "Roberto Clemente" in 1979 in honor of the fabled Pittsburgh Pirates right-fielder. He also collaborated with Bill Bissonnette on the liner notes for this album.

The Barfota Jazzmen, led by cornetist/trumpeter Claes Ringqvist are normally associated with the New Orleans revival movement and highly respected in their native Sweden. The leader wisely added a violin to the lineup for the ragtime sessions and spent countless hours on authentic arrangements. Fans of classic ragtime are nothing, if not critical. They’ll have a tough time finding fault with this recording. The judicious use of violin, clarinet, sousaphone and drums is effective and exciting. The piano takes a "back seat" on the ragtime album and is relegated to the rhythm section.

While the project includes five numbers by Scott Joplin and one by James Scott, there are ample tunes by less-known writers. The title tune, "Cotton Blossom Time" is from the pen of Percy Wenrich (1887-1952), a white composer, a native of Joplin, Missouri. Wenrich was better known for popular songs like "When You Wore a Tulip" and "Put On Your Old Grey Bonnet" but penned a few rags including "The Smiler" and "Red Rose Rag."

A couple of Detroit writers, Fred Stone and Harry Guy contributed "Ma Ragtime Baby" and "Echoes From The Snowball Club." The latter is believed to be the first ragtime waltz (1898).

The New Orleans musician and composer, Alphonse Verges, contributed the popular "Whoa You Heifer" in 1904. Kansas City’s Harry Kelly (1879-1955) offers his highly successful "Peaceful Henry" (1905) and the band handles it perfectly.

The most obscure ragtime writer is represented by two compositions, "African Pas" (1902) and "Havana Rag" (1904). Maurice Kirwin’s biographical information is limited to the dates and publishers of his music. He is known to be from Saint Louis, Missouri but little else is known. However, the quality of the music speaks for itself, especially "Havana."

The Barfota Jazzmen assembled Cotton Blossom Time from several recording sessions in 1997, 2001, 2005 and 2006. All recordings were done in Sweden and are now being released on America’s Jazz Crusade label. In their usual fashion, the label provides a generous 73 minutes of music.

Ragtime fans are welcome to listen to samples on the Jazz Crusade website. It’s fine ragtime!

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Ragtime Jazz - CD Reviews Fri, 09 Feb 2007 18:00:00 -0600
One More: The Summary - Music Of Thad Jones - Vol. 2 by Various Artists http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/one-more-the-summary-music-of-thad-jones-vol.-2-by-various-artists.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/one-more-the-summary-music-of-thad-jones-vol.-2-by-various-artists.html It’s been two long years since the release of One More - The Music Of Thad Jones and, when it received rave reviews, nobody knew there would be a second volume. H…
It’s been two long years since the release of One More - The Music Of Thad Jones and, when it received rave reviews, nobody knew there would be a second volume.

Happily, many of the same stellar musicians return for the new album. Hank Jones, James Moody, Benny Golson, Frank Wess, Jimmy Owens and Richard Davis are back. Bob Brookmeyer and Mickey Roker are replaced by John Mosca and Kenny Washington. The recent session was laid down at New York’s Clinton Studios in May 2005. All compositions are by Thad Jones with the exception of "Groove Merchant" which flowed from the pen of Jerome Richardson. The latter, as one would expect, is a vehicle for reedmen Golson, Wess and Daniels. Jerome Richardson had been lead alto in the Thad Jones band as well as a star in the orchestra of the late Henry Mancini during the days of Peter Gunn.

One of our favorites on the new album has to be "Birdsong" with its wonderful flute and trumpet exchanges between Frank Wess and Jimmy Owens. Interestingly, Frank Wess had taken the flute solos on the first waxing of the tune back in 1957 with Thad’s band.

The absolute highlight is "The Great One." Penned in the early 1970s as a tribute to Louis Armstrong, the piece has a certain blues feeling. Look for great solo work by Owens, Hank Jones, Mosca and the reeds. While the notes attempt to document the order of soloists, it just doesn’t happen on every track. Nevertheless, listeners will appreciate the music in any case. This volume is a gathering of the "greats" belonging to a jazz genre with mass appeal. Thad Jones and his music will not be forgotten. This CD is truly a gem!

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Mon, 08 Jan 2007 06:00:00 -0600
Chillin At Home by JC & The Jazz Hoppers http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/chillin-at-home-by-jc-the-jazz-hoppers.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/chillin-at-home-by-jc-the-jazz-hoppers.html JC & The Jazz Hoppers are new to the American jazz market. Australian jazz guitarist, Jason Campbell, formed the trio a few years ago with organist Col Nolan …
JC & The Jazz Hoppers are new to the American jazz market. Australian jazz guitarist, Jason Campbell, formed the trio a few years ago with organist Col Nolan and drummer Andrew Dickeson.

Chillin’ At Home is a studio production and will be released on this side of the ocean in early January 2007. The combo kicks off the session with a most unlikely number, Bobby McFerrin’s "Don’t Worry, Be Happy." Campbell doesn’t water-down his jazz style in order to sell a few more copies of his CD. A disciple of George Benson, the guitarist traveled to the USA for workshop studies with the likes of John Scofield, Tal Farlow, Freddie Hubbard, Pat Martino and Rodney Jones. This writer noticed a classy 1950s flavor to some of the trio’s work. Listeners are treated to two versions of Tadd Dameron’s 1948 composition "Our Delight." Two Jason Campbell originals are thrown into the mix in the form of the up-tempo "Fresh Roast" and the romantic "Aria 4 Daria."

This is a tightly woven unit with a single voice emanating from the center of the mass. The players have not forgotten their music’s roots and blue notes flow freely as they dish out their exciting sounds. Chillin’ At Home is worth a close listen.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Sun, 31 Dec 2006 18:00:00 -0600
Swinging The Blues by Earl May Quartet http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/swinging-the-blues-by-earl-may-quartet.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/swinging-the-blues-by-earl-may-quartet.html Swinging The Blues by Earl May Quartet
The publicity sheet packaged with my review copy of this CD refers to bassist Earl May as a "musician’s musician." That’s no exaggeration! Earl May made his first recording…
The publicity sheet packaged with my review copy of this CD refers to bassist Earl May as a "musician’s musician." That’s no exaggeration! Earl May made his first recording in 1949 with trumpeter Cat Anderson. Pianist Billy Taylor employed the bassist throughout the 1951 to 1960 period on dozens of record dates and hundreds of live performances.

Often compared to Oscar Pettiford, Paul Chambers and Percy Heath, he worked with small and large groups for almost six decades. In short, May worked with such diverse acts as Dave Van Ronk to Archie Shepp but flourished in the middle ground with leaders like Coleman Hawkins, Charlie Rouse, Shirley Scott, Buddy Rich, Stanley Turrentine and Gene Ammons.

Swinging The Blues is, perhaps, Earl May’s first album as a leader. Surrounding himself with like-minded musicians in the form of Larry Ham, David Glasser and Eddie Locke, the bassist dishes out some familiar jazz pieces like Basie’s title tune, Charlie Parker’s "Confirmation," Sam Coslow’s "My Old Flame" and Lester Young’s "Lester Leaps In." David Glasser’s very smooth alto introduces the familiar melody "Blame it On My Youth."

The legendary pianist, Barry Harris, joins the quartet for an up-tempo and boppish rendition of "Tea For Two" and follows up with a sultry reading of "My Old Flame." Harris’s solo passages are enhanced by May and drummer Eddie Locke.

Earl May wisely added compositions by members of the quartet. The first to be heard is reedman David Glasser’s pretty "Blue Iridescence." Glasser also offers his up-tempo "It’s So Divine" with some nice Larry Ham piano passages.

Larry Ham comes to the forefront with his own "Sioux Suite," a witty takeoff on the familiar "Sweet Sue." Ham joins forces with David Glasser for the collaborative effort titled "Under African Skies." Bassist, leader, Earl May, shines on the tune.

Drummer, Eddie Locke, was not to be left out. He penned the very pretty "Wishes Are Starting To Don’t Come True." It’s a haunting melody that will linger and beg for a replay.

Swinging The Blues will please those folks who enjoy jazz in a straight-ahead, no-nonsense style.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Sun, 02 Jul 2006 07:00:00 -0500
Controlled Nonchalance at the Reggattabar - Vol 2 by Ruby Braff & His Buddies http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/controlled-nonchalance-at-the-reggattabar-vol-2-by-ruby-braff-his-buddies.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/controlled-nonchalance-at-the-reggattabar-vol-2-by-ruby-braff-his-buddies.html Ruby Braff left us in 2003 but won’t soon be forgotten. The mere mention of Braff makes jazz enthusiasts remember "impeccable musicianship." The Boston-born cornetist pl…
Ruby Braff left us in 2003 but won’t soon be forgotten. The mere mention of Braff makes jazz enthusiasts remember "impeccable musicianship."

The Boston-born cornetist played the Bean Town scene during the 1940s and entered the recording studio in 1949 as part of Edmond Hall’s All-Stars. Braff went on to play with the best of the best, from Pee Wee Russell to Benny Goodman to Jack Teagarden. No matter the band, if Braff was there, it would swing.

Controlled Nonchance - Volume One was recorded back in 1993 and when released in 1995, became "best jazz record of the year" by Jazz Journal International. That’s quite a feat for what might be considered a "traditional jazz" session. This 2006 release, Volume 2, offers listeners a delicious second helping. Here are nine more tracks from the Reggatabar including notes by veteran writer Dan Morgenstern.

The new CD presents the Braff sextet swinging more jazz standards from such writers as Duke Ellington, Cole Porter, Johnny Mercer, Fats Waller, Johnny Burke and Jimmy McHugh. The cornetist loved melody and this disc is a fine example of Braff’s good taste. Joined by fellow New Englanders, the leader kicks of the set with Cole Porter’s "It’s All Right With Me" offering the audience to hear brief feature breaks by all members of the band. Another highlight is the Ellington medley. It’s twelve minutes of delightful music and a chance to hear guitarist, Gary Sargent, bassist Marshall Woods and the venerable Dave McKenna. McKenna and Braff played together for half a century. Scott Hamilton delivers some tasty solo work on the "I Got It Bad" portion of the medley.

Bing Crosby had a major hit in 1944 with Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen’s "Swinging On A Star." In spite of the song’s popularity, it is seldom heard as a jazz piece later than the decade of its creation. The Braff sextet kicks the old chestnut along at a moderate tempo and drummer, Chuck Riggs gets a chance to shine. Another old standard, "These Foolish Things," is treated to a beautiful nine minute reading by the band. Both McKenna and the leader are allotted extended solo spots plus a fine example of Gary Sargent’s elegant touch. Hamilton takes the tune out in great style.

This album belongs on the shelf of any Ruby Braff fan. The cornetist is among a group of like-minded musicians and they come together with an explosive version of "Them There Eyes." This one really moves and everyone gets a chance to show-off a bit. We liked Scott Hamilton’s burning solo. Gary Sargent quotes several melodies in his witty and Django-like part.

There are several other tunes that we have not mentioned but you can hear samples on the label’s website. Five stars!

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Thu, 29 Jun 2006 19:00:00 -0500
At St. George Church by Ralph Sutton http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/traditional-/-new-orleans-cd-reviews/at-st.-george-church-by-ralph-sutton.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/traditional-/-new-orleans-cd-reviews/at-st.-george-church-by-ralph-sutton.html Here’s a two-CD set to tempt lovers of stride piano. Probably the last of the vintage stride players, Ralph Sutton, is presented in solo performance in 1992. The setting is…
Here’s a two-CD set to tempt lovers of stride piano. Probably the last of the vintage stride players, Ralph Sutton, is presented in solo performance in 1992. The setting is St. George Church in Brandon Hill, Bristol, England and the 19th century building is noted for having the finest chamber music acoustics in the country.

Hosted by Alyn Shipton, jazz critic for The Times, the concert was broadcast in two parts by the BBC. The most discriminating audiophiles will be pleased with the quality of this session. Both discs begin with brief comments by the announcer and are limited to a couple of minutes, leaving plenty of space for the music that is to follow.

Ralph Sutton kicks-off the first set with "Tea For Two," tipping his hat to Fats Waller and Art Tatum. The six minute reading of the old Vincent Youmans classic gives the appreciative audience a chance to absorb a few of the incredible techniques they will hear during the balance of the concert. In short, it’s an introduction to Harlem Stride.

Fats Waller’s revered "Ain’t Misbehavin’" is given the most soulful treatment ever. It’ll bring a tear to the eye of any Waller fan. Sutton then jumps into a pretty, but unknown song titled "Love Lies." It was introduced to the pianist by Jack Teagarden who played it often. The tender performance shows Sutton’s sentimental side.

Ralph Sutton performs a number of tunes in medley style and each is a tribute to favorite composers including Duke Ellington, Fats Waller, Vernon Duke and the lesser-known Willard Robison. The Robison set includes some great material from the early 1930s. We hear "Old Folks", "’Tain’t So Honey, ‘Tain’t So" and the venerable "Cottage For Sale."

Take a short glance at the song list below and you’ll discover tunes from Bob Zurke’s "Eye Opener" to W.C. Handy’s classic "St Louis Blues." The pianist chats amiably with the audience and adds his personal recollections of both songs and personalities.

Ralph Sutton (1922-2001) was never in better form. This fine performance will sit on my shelf of personal favorites for a long time.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Traditional / New Orleans - CD Reviews Sat, 24 Jun 2006 13:00:00 -0500
En Concierto by Pablo Satek http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/en-concierto-by-pablo-satek.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/straight-ahead-classic-cd-reviews/en-concierto-by-pablo-satek.html In his third release, the Argentine guitarist, Pablo Satek, continues with his trademark ballad style. The young player exhibits a unique approach to solo guitar and his la…
In his third release, the Argentine guitarist, Pablo Satek, continues with his trademark ballad style. The young player exhibits a unique approach to solo guitar and his latest recordings received accolades from guitarist extraordinaire Joe Diorio. Satek counts Diorio, Robben Ford, Sid Jacobs, John Stowell and a host of South American guitarists among his teachers. The 34 year-old musician now teaches in the school where he studied in the past, the Instituto Technologica de Musica Contemporanea.

In 2002, Satek issued Solo Jazz Guitar featuring compositions by Antonio Carlos Jobim, Victor Young and a couple of his own pieces. The new CD offers new versions of some of the songs from his debut recordings and the differences are obvious after five years. Satek is an intense improviser. His treatments of "There Will Never Be Another You" and "Stella By Starlight" are good examples of his innovative style. Just as the listener expects him to go in a particular direction, he moves in another, but with pleasing results.

The new recording includes a pair of Thelonious Monk standards, "Ruby My Dear" and the perennial "Round Midnight." While Satek treats the Monk pieces with reverence, he also places his own mark on them.

The guitarist’s second album was devoted to Beatles tunes and the latest CD offers an updated vibrant delivery of George Harrison’s "Something." It obviously endeared Satek to the enthusiastic audience at the San Rafael Jazz Club.

This album may be hard to find at your local music shop.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Richard Bourcier) Straight-Ahead - CD Reviews Sun, 18 Jun 2006 07:00:00 -0500