Lyn Horton

Lyn Horton

Three solo piano concerts came fast and furiously one week after the other in February to the Northampton, MA, Center for the Arts. Three distinct approaches to the piano made the series both educational and memorable, but also pointed out a characteristic which revealed clarity to the distinction among the three.

Uri Caine was the first of the three soloists. Here is a pianist who goes explosively and voraciously for the piano. The marriage between Caine and the piano is noticeably mech

Trio X has impressed its name on the world of music. Questions were once raised about the meaning of the X, particularly by me. According to American history, the X correlates to the signature of a slave who had no name. For this trio, its name is associated with a definite sound signature. The X has become reflexive, for there is only one Trio X.

In a Sunday afternoon gig arranged by the Arts for Art group at the Clemente Soto Velez Center, Trio X broadened the small stage on which th

Attending this first concert of 2006 was an easy choice for me to make. It was the very idea of the duo performance of David Arner on piano and Michael Bisio on string bass that took me the distance from where I write here to where I could hear them. And the music transcended the miles I traveled.

Arner chooses his musical syntax from an encyclopedic knowledge of the capacity of the keyboard. Bisio rewards the listener with a soft and dedicated approach to the bass st

It is perpetual, the struggle for recognition by Black Americans and all who relate to minority status within this country. The crux of the matter is that minorities long to be heard in their original tongue. It is a means to establish their identity. How often their natural language can be found in their original music, historically the music for which they are known but through which they are not heard, perhaps only taken for granted.

At the last Solos and Duos concert of the UMass/A

Mr. Billy Bang knows nothing but reverence to his violin, the music he makes with it and the inspiration behind the music. He takes nothing for granted. He is in love with his life and how it means to be alive.

The inherent quality of these characteristics were expressed intensely, energetically and with determination when tiny Mr. Bang stood with his violin as a larger than life soloist on a moderately-sized stage in a moderately-sized hall, packed with dedicated listeners who travele

29.01.2011

Extolling Ecstasy

Published in Concert Reviews

It is a privilege for me to experience the performances of musicians who are unmistakably committed to what they do musicians who live and breathe the music musicians whose acquaintance with newness leads to an outpouring of fearlessness in how to build music from seeming nothingness, starting with one note.

And the note came from Peter Brõtzmann’s bass clarinet----the note seared the air to open wide a field of possibilities. The note was dark .the drums, Nasheet Waits lightly brushed

29.01.2011

Revering Rollins

Published in Concert Reviews
Writing an article about Sonny Rollins is like taking water into one’s hands for a long-awaited drink and not letting the precious liquid seep through the fingers. It is like taking a better photograph of the Grand Canyon. It is like standing on the top of Mt. Everest and absorbing the view.

My seat at Tanglewood was in the first balcony way up behind the band. The people next to me were complaining how they wouldn’t be able to see Rollins. Even though I didn’t say anything, I knew that Rolli

Matthew Shipp, William Parker and Mat Maneri constitute a group seemingly impervious to pursuing anything other than the apotheosis of what they do. These musicians demonstrate such confidence in their attitude, approach, and propensity for simply diving into making their music that bringing it into question well that would reveal a complete lack of vision, interest, and willingness to discover on the percipient's part.

All suited up, the members of the trio moved onto the stage at the

The members of Trio X are Dominic Duval, Jay Rosen and Joe McPhee. Each has his own unique sound. Taken further, the group’s capacity to put these unique sounds and their unique temperaments together result in a brilliant and common determination: to make their music unforgettably engaging.

Trio X is a young ensemble maybe seven years old. In the beginning of a new venture, the musicians start as innocents with each other. The more they play together, the more the audience can wrap

To the uninitiated audience, a performance by the Peter Broetzmann Tentet may seem cacophonous, potentially unendurable and incomprehensible. Nothing could be further from the truth. The most salient means to identify with a performance of this group is, without resistance, to fall into the energy, sincerity and the joy underlying the making of the music.

The Tentet is a group of musicians that fluctuates in personnel. For some reason, I always thought that this ensemble woul