Displaying items by tag: Electronica - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection - jazzreview.com - Your Jazz Music Connection http://www.jazzreview.com Tue, 23 May 2017 10:29:58 -0500 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Incognito Goodbye To Yesterday Radio Edit http://www.jazzreview.com/free-jazz-mp3-downloads/incognito-goodbye-to-yesterday-radio-edit.html http://www.jazzreview.com/free-jazz-mp3-downloads/incognito-goodbye-to-yesterday-radio-edit.html "Goodbye To Yesterday" is the debut single from Incognito's 15th album Surreal. Bandleader Jean-Paul "Bluey" Maunick recalls the genesis of the song, "Goodbye To Yesterday" featuring Mo Brandis, who also co-wrote and co-produced the track with me, was the by-product of two creative minds a generation apart, proves that great melodies and well crafted lyrics hold the key to creations that have a timeless quality to them. This song could have easily been sung by Steve Winwood in the 60's, Stevie Wonder in the 70's, Michael Jackson in the 80's, George Michael in the 90's. The catchy horn lines arranged…

A SURREAL INTRODUCTION
By Bluey of Incognito

Say the word surreal and various things come to mind - dreamlike, unreal, fantastic, odd, bizarre or even weird. For me the experiences leading to the final outcome of Incognito's fifteenth studio album have been an amalgamation of all these synonyms and expressions!

We have our own sound and we have a fan base worldwide, but this was not the time to sit on our laurels or cut corners to compete in a struggling market place, nor was it time to just do just enough to get by. For each one of us taking part in the making of Surreal this was our chance to make bold statements, hone in our skills, dig deep into our creative souls and produce a body of work that we would all be extremely proud of. Job done!

On the 19th of February 2012 the album was completed and it was an incredible sensation to ride with the band with the tracks blasting out of the car stereo system.  It's one thing to have lived with these songs for several months in the studio, but the true satisfaction comes from enjoying the songs without critically analyzing them.

Unlike the last album apart from the welcome appearance of my awesome musical muse Maysa and a few special guest musicians, this was a real band effort with most of the material performed by the current touring band.  My focus from day one was song writing. From 50 songs down to 30, and then to 25 solid recordings and finally to the chosen 14 that makes Surreal.

From the thunderous opening of the very funky bass driven "The Less You Know," co-produced and co-written by our bass player Francis Hylton. Maysa delivers like only she can with a sweetness that is not only contrasting to the heavy rhythm but with a tonal delivery that combines to create something totally fresh and unique. Maysa is also featured on "Capricorn Sun," a song which I had written on my guitar after reflecting on a friend's ongoing battles with his Capricorn partner. The song is given greater expression by Maysa's outstanding voice.

From the moment I played "Goodbye To Yesterday," to my band, my manager, my family and our various international record companies, I got the same response... "That's the first single" they all chimed!  Co-written and co-produced by the band's new wonder kid, Mo Brandis, this song has had an amazing effect on everybody involved in the Incognito machinery. If there is a young vocalist that can deliver on both sides as a modern R&B vocalist and a soulful old school crooner - it is Mo! This song and "Don't Wanna Know," came from one the most enjoyable co-writing sessions I've ever had the pleasure to be a part of.
The last of his three cuts "This Must Be Love" came from a band collaborative effort in early 2011. I had written the lyrics as and expression of gratitude for the presence of love in my life.

Song writing is such a personal thing and lyric writing, in particular,  is something that I have always felt uneasy with when collaborating. This was indeed not the case on this album, first with Mo and then with Natalie (Williams). I felt strength in sharing ideas and formulating stories and real joy in the structure of the melodies. "Above The Night" was the first of three songs featuring Natalie Williams and it still blows me away every time I hear it. I first became aware of Natalie when we played Ronnie Scott's and she was the lead vocalist of the house band. My first reaction was "She is amazing, what can we do to get this super busy bee (She is the most in demand vocalist in London) to join the band. With the help of our intrepid musical director Matt Cooper, who was also part of this writing partnership, we began a pressure group that she finally relented to.  "Restless As We are" and the sparse 70's rhythm box inspired Bossa Nova "The Stars From Here," are the other cuts featuring Natalie.

If there was ever one person that you need in your corner to deliver massive vocal performances throughout heavy touring schedules and time constricted studio sessions, it is Vanessa Haynes. "Ain't It Time," "Don't Break Me Down" and "To Be With You" are three fine examples of her incredible power and subtlety. Her naturally giving nature is reflected in each of her performances. There is a smile on my face whenever Vanessa is around and now listening to her cuts on this album, I realize that the smile will be there whenever I listen to these songs!

Surreal's penultimate track, "The Way You Love," is collaboration with my dear friend and Incognito contributor Richard Bull, and as can be expected, his drum grooves and his bass lines dominate the proceedings, creating a muscular platform for the unison vocals to dance on.

Jazz funk hardcore Incognito fans will be happy to hear that my passion for the music that shaped my musical career is on display in the form of two driving instrumentals "Rivers On The Sun," complete with solos and a superb horn arrangement, and "Thoughtful Fantasies," a nod to our beloved Brazilian Funk with all horns blazing, percussion break and everything!

To complete the package, I turned to West London's highly creative graphic designer, Mitchy Bwoy, which has resulted in the album's vibrant and distinctive look. The great surrealist painter Salvador Dali once said, "At the age of six I wanted to be a cook. At seven I wanted to be Napoleon. And my ambition has been growing steadily ever since."
With this album another part of my ambition has been realized... I'm a lucky fellow!

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (1888 Media) Free Jazz MP3 Downloads Thu, 05 Apr 2012 20:00:58 -0500
As Real as Thinking by Machine Mass Trio http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/progressive-cd-reviews/as-real-as-thinking-by-machine-mass-trio.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/progressive-cd-reviews/as-real-as-thinking-by-machine-mass-trio.html As Real as Thinking by Machine Mass Trio
New York City-reared veteran and well-travelled drummer Tony Bianco has been a mainstay in global modern jazz and improvisational circles amid prolific engagements with sax pioneers Evan Parker and David Liebman. Here, he aligns with youthful European inventors, guitarist Michel Delville (The Wrong Object) and nascent saxophonist Jordi Grognard for a program that pushes the envelope via structural baselines and heavy doses of improvisation.

New York City-reared veteran and well-travelled drummer Tony Bianco has been a mainstay in global modern jazz and improvisational circles amid prolific engagements with sax pioneers Evan Parker and David Liebman. Here, he aligns with youthful European inventors, guitarist Michel Delville (The Wrong Object) and nascent saxophonist Jordi Grognard for a program that pushes the envelope via structural baselines and heavy doses of improvisation.

Call it what you will, but the band offers a kaleidoscopic stance, featuring avant jazz-rock, free-improv, and an open forum, spanning multiple concepts. But the key indicator resides within the artists' signature sound and balanced modus operandi. Unlike similar ventures by others, the trio incorporates memorable melodies into its often scathing attack, touched with pure delight and harrowing undertones.

They respectively integrate electronics into the mix, largely to place emphasis on certain parts or to help drive home spiraling riffs with spacey treatments and doomsday-like effects. Yet the eighteen-minute "Falling Up," is a duet between Bianco and Delville, devised on an expansive plane and featuring quirky EFX-driven interludes, and a maniacally climactic theme-building foray. Providing semblances to Jimi Hendrix's angular, aerial assault on The Star Spangled Banner, Delville transmits a modern psychedelic spin with notions of angst and destruction atop Bianco's symphony of drums, percussion and loops. Moreover, the guitarist rockets into cosmic territory with unbridled intensity as the duo gradually descends back to the level of energy displayed at the onset.

Indeed, a rather stunning release as Grognard plays an equally important role on the remaining tracks and brings a core jazz element to the table. Rigid classifications aside, the trio's multidimensional fabrics of sound, and cunning modes of delivery generates a synchronous stream of consciousness framed on layers of exciting interplay and tangible plot developments. A top-shelf product for 2011...

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Glenn Astarita) Progressive - CD Reviews Thu, 19 Jan 2012 21:26:34 -0600
TransFUSION by Art 'Spike' Schloemer feat. Scott Henderson, Dennis Chambers, Bunny Brunel, Hadrien Feraud, Bob Franceschini, Kirk Covington http://www.jazzreview.com/new-jazz-releases/transfusion-by-art-spike-schloemer.html http://www.jazzreview.com/new-jazz-releases/transfusion-by-art-spike-schloemer.html This album is the fruit of two years of hard work. Spike put tremendous effort into writing and arranging the music. The intention was to create a fresh, unique album with his own style, mixing jazz-rock with some world and trance touch. His goal was not to create something only for jazz-rock fusion fans, but also for everyday customers of groove-music. The CD was fourth on Amazon's Best Seller Jazz ranking and simultaneously one of the most pre-ordered albums at AbstractLogix. The track called "For Joe" was third in Jazz Rock World Fusion Radio's weekly top 20 of 12-16-2011. Spike…
  • This album is the fruit of two years of hard work. Spike put tremendous effort into writing and arranging the music. The intention was to create a fresh, unique album with his own style, mixing jazz-rock with some world and trance touch. His goal was not to create something only for jazz-rock fusion fans, but also for everyday customers of groove-music. The CD was fourth on Amazon's Best Seller Jazz ranking and simultaneously one of the most pre-ordered albums at AbstractLogix. The track called "For Joe" was third in Jazz Rock World Fusion Radio's weekly top 20 of 12-16-2011. Spike composed the song in memory of Joe Zawinul.

Analyzing the album - the construction of the arranges, the freschness of material, the sounds of the tunes, the power and the intensity of playing the tracks, the rhythmically intense - it has an immensely individual touch.

  • Press Review:

Like his idol, the late Joe Zawinul, keyboardist Art 'Spike' Schloemer seeks to erase whatever perceived lines lie between jazz, rock, funk and world music. On his new TransFUSION CD, Schloemer arrives well- armed for the task by enlisting some of jazz/fusion's top open-minded artists: guitarist Scott Henderson, saxophonist Bob Franceschini, bassists Bunny Brunel and Hadrien Feraud, and drummers Dennis Chambers and Kirk Covington.

The opening track, "Concussion," shows additional Schloemer influences from the classic fusion era of the '70s. The piece's epic theme, and Feraud's nimble bass line, echo the work of Chick Corea and Stanley Clarke in Return To Forever.

Brunel guests on the subsequent "Space Flight," and his liquid tone and soloing guide Schloemer's synthesizer into the soaring stratosphere of Weather Report, Zawinul's primary vessel during his stellar career. Chambers' contribution is on "Distant Horizon," another far-reaching Weather Report revisit because of his shell-game with the time signature and Schloemer's darting electric piano.

Henderson worked in Zawinul's post-Weather Report group the Zawinul Syndicate, and the guitarist's prodigious firepower burns throughout "Challenge Day." Built on another epic theme by Schloemer, the energetic track is akin to Henderson's '90s work in the band Tribal Tech (which also featured a Zawinul-influenced keyboardist in Scott Kinsey).

Covington, Tribal Tech's drummer, guests on the closing "Keep Relaxed". A high-octane funk number that belies its title, the cut gets extra fuel through the drummer's signature hummingbird-like fills. Franceschini, best-known for his work in guitarist Mike Stern's group, makes a statement through his solo on "Brain Fever," another Schloemer composition that blends jazz technique with rock intensity.

The guest stars may be the drawing card on TransFUSION, but the guest-free tracks are no less alluring. "Sentimental Journey" sounds like a trip through Zawinul's entire career through its acoustic piano, programming, and chanted vocals.

"Good Times" is a Motown-inspired funk vehicle that could've been an alternate theme to the urban '70s sitcom of the same name; "Indie Dance" manages to blend Middle Eastern and be-bop feels, and the entrancing "For Joe" is Schloemer's ode to his late mentor.

Aside from the work of his special guests, Schloemer is responsible for the entirety of TransFUSION, making the disc an otherwise incredible singular achievement. Through his compositions, arrangements, multi-instrumental playing and programming, the keyboardist always manages to sound like he's looking forward -- even as he reaches backward for inspiration.
- Bill Meredith -

  • Links:

http://jazz-rock.com/artists-ArtS.html

album description:
http://artschloemer.blogspot.com/

order album online:
http://www.abstractlogix.com/xcart/product.php?productid=25344

album mp3 download:
http://www.amazon.com/Transfusion-Feat-Scott-Henderson-Covington-Francheschini/dp/B00651CBUK/ref=sr_shvl_album_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1321033440&sr=301-1

MySpace:
http://www.myspace.com/artschloemer

Reverbnation
http://www.reverbnation.com/artschloemer

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Spicy Keys Records) New Jazz Releases Mon, 09 Jan 2012 04:55:53 -0600
Flak Planet by Combat Astronomy http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/progressive-cd-reviews/flak-planet-by-combat-astronomy.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/progressive-cd-reviews/flak-planet-by-combat-astronomy.html Flak Planet by Combat Astronomy
With inferences to metal-drenched avant-garde jazz, sounds of doom, and crazed electronica based free-jazz; Combat Astronomy's fourth album extends its bizarre, apocalyptic spin on cross-genre stylizations.  With notable British experimentalists and avant-garde perpetrators shaping the crazed vistas, leader, conceptualizer, and five-string electric bassist James Huggett lays down some of the heaviest bass lines known to mankind with guerrilla tactics and calamitous sound-sculpting maneuvers.  Huggett overdubs bass lines within various parts, and needless to say, envelops an ominous undercurrent throughout the broad plane of lower and upper-register tonal contrasts.

With inferences to metal-drenched avant-garde jazz, sounds of doom, and crazed electronica based free-jazz; Combat Astronomy's fourth album extends its bizarre, apocalyptic spin on cross-genre stylizations.  With notable British experimentalists and avant-garde perpetrators shaping the crazed vistas, leader, conceptualizer, and five-string electric bassist James Huggett lays down some of the heaviest bass lines known to mankind with guerrilla tactics and calamitous sound-sculpting maneuvers.  Huggett overdubs bass lines within various parts, and needless to say, envelops an ominous undercurrent throughout the broad plane of lower and upper-register tonal contrasts.

Combat Astronomy takes your listening space under siege.  They open with a fat e-bass note on "The Stone Tape," followed by trombonist Derek Saw's intense, soul-searching motif atop mega electronic drumming parts and crashing cymbal hits.  Multi-instrumentalist Martin Archer employs a bass recorder amid his saxes and bass clarinet work, in alliance with reedman Mick Beck's bassoon segments, where the bass element is reinforced to the hilt.  Hence, the avant metal/jazz aura remains a constant as jazz-based improvisation attains a bizarre equilibrium with the loud and oscillating death-metal type grooves. 

"Infinity Decay" starts out with an eerie organ vamp that could intimate an entry-point into a mysterious subterranean dwelling.  It's an ethereal interlude of sorts, culminated with subliminal treatments and a sense of unsettling anticipation.  The musicians proceed to interweave an electro-organic component into the final moments; however, they return with a neural impetus on the doomsday laden and 4-part "Inverted Universe."  Here, visions of an angry titan's footsteps come to mind via slightly distorted bass, subsequently shaded by simmering woodwinds choruses and a booming rock pulse. 

Daring and somewhat innovative, Combat Astronomy's perilous journey into the unknown tenders a thrills-per-minute experience.   With gut-wrenching patterns and a larger than life sound, the album should be branded with a clause, stating that the audience should play at their own risk.  The artists' purveyance of imagery set on a colossal soundscape could also serve as a proving ground for a high-end stereo system.  Indeed, a top selection for 2011.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Glenn Astarita) Progressive - CD Reviews Sun, 01 Jan 2012 06:01:07 -0600
Chillin Out in Dark Places by Joe Blessett http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/smooth-jazz-cd-reviews/chillin-out-in-dark-places-by-joe-blessett.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/smooth-jazz-cd-reviews/chillin-out-in-dark-places-by-joe-blessett.html Chillin Out in Dark Places by Joe Blessett
Joe Blessett makes an interesting case for going into the studio and doing your own thing.  His sixth release as a solo artist has him everywhere, laying down music tracks on several instruments, voicing over for effect, mixing, and even marketing his own product.  The result is a pastiche of music that runs from smooth to funk, and tracks that run in and out like a fever dream. 

 Joe Blessett makes an interesting case for going into the studio and doing your own thing.  His sixth release as a solo artist has him everywhere, laying down music tracks on several instruments, voicing over for effect, mixing, and even marketing his own product.  The result is a pastiche of music that runs from smooth to funk, and tracks that run in and out like a fever dream. 

He's certainly an individualist, and has his own take on creating music.  Classifying his music is pointless, because he eclectically combines several styles as the mood suits him.  He describes it as "a private library of music," a sort of personal soundtrack from his head.  Some tracks sound very much along the lines of smooth jazz, while others are more funky, with electronics and vocals making a case.  In a few places, he is closer to dance music, going heavy on the electronic side with a strong beat.  Whichever way he turns, he quickly changes his direction, flowing from mood to mood.  The overall effect is of the artist searching for something, a restless, ethereal quality that some may find intriguing, and others a bit annoying.  Stay put for a minute.

"What's Your Secret" features some unidentified guest vocalizations by a woman apparently having a good time, along the lines of the sounds Meg Ryan made in the restaurant scene in "When Harry Met Sally."  As the woman at the adjacent table said,
"I'll have what she's having."  Several other tracks also have female voices repeating phrases, fading in and out, acting much like the instruments Blessett includes.  These are often in the more funky, electronic tracks.  Sax dominates on the smoother pieces.  Blessett has a fine sound on the sax, one that sings and cries, sometimes wails or has a ghostly feel, but is never weak and is always spot on.  

If you're looking for musical eclecticism that combines styles in unique ways, Joe Blessett may just be your ticket to a different sound experience.  But don't look for him at your local club.  He is apparently a studio-only artist.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Jeff Wanser) Smooth Jazz - CD Reviews Sun, 01 Jan 2012 07:00:32 -0600
Charles Rendition by Fjordne http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/ambient-jazz-cd-reviews/charles-rendition-by-fjordne.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/ambient-jazz-cd-reviews/charles-rendition-by-fjordne.html Charles Rendition by Fjordne
Fjordne (given name, Shunichiro Fujimoto) produces music that is adventurous, expansive and a bit other-worldly, yet highly listenable and absorbing. His approach is to feature the piano as the melodic centerpiece and have electronic sounds create various moods around it. The effects change from track to track, but are sometimes wistful, other times nostalgic and occasionally mysterious.

Fjordne (given name, Shunichiro Fujimoto) produces music that is adventurous, expansive and a bit other-worldly, yet highly listenable and absorbing. His approach is to feature the piano as the melodic centerpiece and have electronic sounds create various moods around it. The effects change from track to track, but are sometimes wistful, other times nostalgic and occasionally mysterious.

This is not Fjordne's first recording, having made four previously, and this is his second for the Kitchen label. The label is known for high-end art productions. The limited-run CD normally comes in a 7-inch cover with specially produced accompanying materials, including a short story by the composer, program and artwork. None of this came with the review copy and so we will focus on the music rather than the printed product.

The inspiration for this work comes from Charles Dickens' novel "Great Expectations," from which his short story derives, and the tracks are a series of vignettes that evoke a sense of wonder, loss and decadence. Presumably, the Charles of the title refers to Dickens. Much of the beauty of the album comes from Fjordne's remarkable piano melodies that continue unabated throughout, although they change with more nostalgic sounds in earlier tracks, swinging, groove-based playing in the middle and greater dissonance towards the end. The last track brings us back to a mood evoking the earliest ones. Influenced by pianists such as Bobo Stenson and Paul Bley, one can hear some elements of free jazz and European third stream in Fjordne's playing.

The electronic sounds add or run counter to the mood of the piano and vary from percussion, to strings, to vocals to ambient sounds. In some cases, they offer a countermelody, giving the impression of an Ivesian polytonality or the feeling that one is listening to two pieces of music coming from different rooms. The effect is both startling and quite lovely. The vocal pieces, such as in "Gathering" and "hope," sound like cabaret music from another country, world-weary and regretful. With "forfeiture" Fjordne starts to get his groove on and while the rhythm is never fast, it is always insistent, forcing an intensity to the piece. "hope" is anything but hopeful and the listener is not disappointed to hear a female voice break in with a sad, childlike refrain, followed by a swirling chaos of fragmented melody and ambient sounds. "Ald square" continues the mood, replacing the vocals with saxophone and seeming like a fever dream. A beautiful melody slowly breaks apart in "Ebenze" before coming back to a resolution, while "antidotal" does nearly the opposite, beginning with a set of fragments that dissolve into a melody, that is then joined by an distant, dissonant chorus.

Fjordne clearly has a unique vision for his work and I would certainly like to hear more. The print run for the physical edition of this CD is 700 copies, but the music is also available in digital format.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Jeff Wanser) Ambient Jazz - CD Reviews Wed, 28 Dec 2011 12:19:34 -0600
Celestial Ghetto by M'lumbo http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/electronica-cd-reviews/celestial-ghetto-by-mlumbo.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/electronica-cd-reviews/celestial-ghetto-by-mlumbo.html Celestial Ghetto by M'lumbo
  Psychedelic pranksters M'lumbo return with the amusingly titled Celestial Ghetto. The title of the album is quite fitting as M'lumbo draw from many sources, and can alternate seamlessly between the gritty and the ethereal. With M'lumbo, there is no distinction between high and low art where refined soloing is juxtaposed against a sense of nutty humor. This might be irritating to some (why obscure a perfectly good solo with seemingly random samples?) but this recording is refreshingly free from intellectual pretenses.

Psychedelic pranksters M'lumbo return with the amusingly titled Celestial Ghetto. The title of the album is quite fitting as M'lumbo draw from many sources and can alternate seamlessly between the gritty and the ethereal. With M'lumbo, there is no distinction between high and low art where refined soloing is juxtaposed against a sense of nutty humor. This might be irritating to some (why obscure a perfectly good solo with seemingly random samples?) but this recording is refreshingly free from intellectual pretenses.

The sound itself is expansive and dense. There is a lot of space and a lot of clutter in this music at precisely the same time. Psychedelic washes of sound and a variety samples help create a sense of druggy distance, but there are so many solos and voices that the songs can sound frantic and unorganized. The production is excellently done. A bad job would have hopelessly buried the layers of this album in an unrecognizable mess. The album sounds immediate, full and clear enough to hear everything that is going on—and there is a lot going on.

The winding solos, room for improvisation and general daring tip Celestial Ghetto off as a jazz record. That said, fans of left field hip-hop or electronically minded jam bands will likely feel right at home with this recording. Digitalized beats and samples are prevalent. There are bleeps and bloops, funky drums and smug samples in every nook and cranny of this recording.

In short, the playing is good enough to reward careful listening, although the samples can often make it difficult to concentrate on the subtleties of the instrumentalists. But Celestial Ghetto succeeds on its own terms. It is a stubbornly original, well played and fun recording. Any music fan looking for something unique, carefree and perhaps a bit insane might do well to check this release out.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Eric Prinzing) Electronica - CD Reviews Mon, 21 Nov 2011 15:29:27 -0600
Rise and Fall by Hamilton Sterling CD Released http://www.jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/rise-and-fall-by-hamilton-sterling-cd-released.html http://www.jazzreview.com/jazz-news/press-releases/rise-and-fall-by-hamilton-sterling-cd-released.html Rise and Fall - A meditation on civilization undone, inspired both by the present and representations of the past. These mostly live loop improvisations feature fretless bass, acoustic bass guitar, and midi-following synths and effects. Sequenced compositions utilize rhythms adapted from ancient Greek poetry.

Rise and Fall - A meditation on civilization undone, inspired both by the present and representations of the past.

These mostly live loop improvisations feature fretless bass, acoustic bass guitar, and midi-following synths and effects. Sequenced compositions utilize rhythms adapted from ancient Greek poetry.

Rise and Fall was produced, composed, and performed by Hamilton Sterling.

Rise and Fall was recorded, mixed, and mastered at Helikon Sound. Migration by Hamilton Sterling and Jimmy Haslip was Helikon Sound's previous release.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Hamilton Sterling & Jimmy Haslip) Press Releases Mon, 29 Aug 2011 22:44:03 -0500
Cinematic Life by Eliott James http://www.jazzreview.com/jazz-spotlights/cinematic-life-by-eliott-james.html http://www.jazzreview.com/jazz-spotlights/cinematic-life-by-eliott-james.html Cinematic Life by Eliott James
MULTI-TALENTED COMPOSER MIXES JAZZ WITH ELECTRONICA AND ROCK January 10, 2005 (Los Angeles, CA) -- Eliott James has released his new album "Cinemat...

MULTI-TALENTED COMPOSER MIXES JAZZ WITH ELECTRONICA AND ROCK

January 10, 2005 (Los Angeles, CA) -- Eliott James has released his new album "Cinematic Life." The CD contains 11 tracks of electro-jazz mixed with ambient and rock influences. James is a composer musician and poet.

Eliott was almost 17 when he hit the road to play colleges and small clubs in the style that is now called singer-songwriter. He also played as the opening act for several nationally known performers. He performed hundred of times throughout the early "80s and has recorded in his project studio over the last fourteen years.

In Spring of 2005 I sat down to the keyboard and felt like a blank canvas was in front of me. I was free to create what I felt. I play keyboards and guitar and also use licensed loops and samples to flesh out my songs. They came slowly at first and then streamed out. Six months later I had about fifteen songs written. I chose eleven songs for the new CD. This CD is not in the singer-songwriter vein. I suppose this music is closest to what's called electro-jazz."

But he still has a passion for acoustic elements as heard on his new CD with cello harp piano upright bass and guitar. These sounds are mixed with strong beats synths giving us eleven songs that span several styles that are hard to classify and even harder to compare to other artists.

"Yes it was a musical change long overdue.I"ve always been a fan of jazz and many different styles. I like strong beats world music acoustic elements nature sounds and synths. I"ve simply allowed myself to bring out what has been in my head and heart for some time. It gives me joy to be part of it's creation. To take sounds and mold them to arrange them to allow these sounds to seep into my emotions and back out again. I get so much out of creating music. When someone enjoys it the circle is completed."

'

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Morrice Blackwell) Jazz Spotlights Thu, 30 Jun 2005 19:00:00 -0500
Jazz Serpentine by Peace Junkee http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/electronica-cd-reviews/jazz-serpentine-by-peace-junkee.html http://www.jazzreview.com/cd-reviews/electronica-cd-reviews/jazz-serpentine-by-peace-junkee.html Peace Junkee is the brain child of Neil Robinson. Born in Liverpool, England, Robinson has self-released and produced this collection of atmospheric music closely akin t…

Peace Junkee is the brain child of Neil Robinson. Born in Liverpool, England, Robinson has self-released and produced this collection of atmospheric music closely akin to Tangerine Dream, but with catchy beats and a very overt sense of groove in the jazz realm. All of the music is synthesizer generated and created and played by Robinson.

The release opens with "Peaceful Oasis," a nice light tune perfect for driving with the top down. The synthesized vibraphone lead placed on top of a heavy cymbal-driven drum loop creates a pleasant and scintillating effect. "The Rainmaker" is much more on the spacey end and thus closer to Tangerine Dream. The thing that distinguishes each of these tracks is the strong evidence of uptempo drum loops, which help to move the music forward. If Robinson does nothing else well on this recording, his drum loops are well chosen and perfectly suited for the melodies he places on top of them. On "But Secretly We Thirst," the third track, there is a long section in the middle of the track where the drum beat is taken out. The result is a dreamlike shifting pattern of sounds that sit comfortably with each other.

If there is a problem with the disc it is the repetitiveness of the tracks. There is just not a lot of diversity from track to track. Not that Robinson doesn’t have musical chops, a single listen to "On The Edge’s" wonderfully agile and quickly flying keyboard lines will instantly prove just how adept and accomplished he is with his keyboard chops, but on the whole the sounds from track to track are very homogenous. The melodies are truly nice, but they don’t stand out apart from each other as one listens through the disc. In the end, the recording is nice and Robinson has real talent in not just creating wonderful dreamlike sequences, but also with regard to his musical accomplishment. Taking the disc for what it is will certainly make many listeners pleased.

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morrice.blackwell@gmail.com (Thomas R. Erdmann) Electronica - CD Reviews Wed, 18 Feb 2009 18:00:00 -0600